UNDP-EU: Poverty Reduction

women workingTo increase access to food in Bangladesh, almost 25,000 women participated in UNDP-EU supported cash-for-work activities to rehabilitate public assets. Today, 82% of these women live on earnings from their own micro-enterprises. Photo: Salman Saeed, UNDP Bangladesh

In partnership, UNDP and the EU work with countries around the world to support them in reducing poverty levels and achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.

In tackling poverty issues, we work together with local actors including community leaders, local government officials, civil society activists, farmers and entrepreneurs. These are the people who know best what does and does not work within their communities - and they should have the voice and the support they need to work their way towards a better quality of life. For example, over 2.5 million people in Ukraine benefitted from improved living conditions in their communities - from health care, water supply, energy-saving street illumination to renovated schools and kindergartens.

Our partnership includes projects that focus on areas such as livelihoods and employment. For example, to increase access to food in Bangladesh, almost 25,000 women participated in UNDP-EU supported cash-for-work activities to rehabilitate public assets such as roads. Today, 82% of these women live on earnings from their own micro-enterprises. In Guinea Conakry, we engaged and employed youth to rehabilitate water systems and public buildings.

We also work on agricultural development and food security, such as in Cuba, where over 13,000 farmers received support from the partnership, and in Central America, where a regional programme contributes to reduction of food insecurity among the most vulnerable people. In Eritrea, the partnership supports some 25,000 vulnerable, women-headed households with better access to food.

Access to education, health and nutrition, and support to internally displaced people, are other areas where our partnership is strong. In Cambodia, support to local development brought schools closer to the children, which meant that parents didn't have to make the tough decision between either sending their children to live with relatives, or taking their children out of school. In the remote region of Chittagong Hill Tracts in Bangladesh, 20,000 children got improved access to education.

Our partnership also supports countries to achieve economic growth. In Albania, we worked with the Kukes Region on small scale tourism and environmental related interventions, helping the region make better use of its socioeconomic and natural potentials in generating economic growth.

In Georgia, a joint programme on microfinance assisted displaced people, women entrepreneurs and small start-up businesses.

Our partnership aims at empowering marginalized groups in societies. For example, in Albania, the partnership supports the social inclusion of Roma and Egyptian communities.

Migration, and especially its link to development, is another area where the UNDP-EU partnership has deepened in recent years. The Joint Migration and Development Initiative (JMDI) is a testimony to this growing interest in the strong links between migration and development.

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